Hair Follicle Drug Testing Kansas

Hair Follicle Drug Testing Kansas

Hair Follicle Drug Testing Kansas

5 Panel – 10 Panel – 12 Panel

Hair Follicle Drug Test

Accredited Drug Testing Inc provides hair follicle drug testing Kansas in all cities and most Kansas testing centers are located within minutes of your home or office. To schedule a hair follicle drug test in Kansas call (800)221-4291.

Hair follicle drug testing in the State of Kansas is becoming a more popular method by Kansas employers and individuals in need of a hair follicle drug testing Kansas method.

In recent years the method to conduct drug testing has more frequently included a hair follicle drug test. Many employers, courts and Substance Abuse Professional are requiring a hair follicle drug test instead of a standard urine test. Hair follicle drug tests are used by employers who have zero tolerance drug use policies, courts and individuals on probation. The primary benefit of a hair follicle drug test include a much longer detection period for drug use which typically is up to 90 days. However, when screening drug use within the last 5 days the urine test continues to be the most accurate test.

Hair Follicle Drug Test Process 

The procedure used to perform a hair follicle test is simple, the drug testing specialist will cut approximately 120 strands of hair (not really a lot) utilize a chain of custody procedure and send the hair to a certified laboratory for analysis. Drug testing centers require at least 1.5 inches of hair to perform this test and the hair generally needs to come from the head, however if the donor does not have head hair certain testing centers can use hair from chest, leg or arm pit.

If a donor has no hair on their body, than a hair test cannot be performed!  

Hair Follicle Drug Test Results

Once the hair follicles have been analyzed by a certified laboratory they will then be reviewed and then verified by a Medical Review Officer (licensed Physician) who will than release the results. Generally a negative hair follicle drug test result is available in 2-3 days. A non-negative hair follicle drug test is available in approximately 5 days.

Urine cut-off levels are expressed in nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) or as a weight of drug per unit volume of urine. Hair cut-off levels are expressed in picograms per milligram (pg/mg) or as a weight of drug per unit weight of hair

5 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 5 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamine
  • Cocaine
  • Marijuana
  • Opiates
  • Phencyclidine

5 Panel w/ Expanded Opiates Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 5 panel w/ expanded Opiates hair drug test screens for the standard 5 drugs but will also screen for Opiate class drugs such as pain killers, which may indicate abuse of prescription drugs

  • Amphetamine
  • EXPANDED OPIATES
  • Hydromorphone
  • Cocaine
  • Codeine
  • Oxycodone
  • Marijuana
  • Morphine
  • Oxymorphone
  • Phencyclidine
  • Hydrocodone
  • 6 AM- Heroine

10 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 10 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamines
  • Marijuana
  • Barbiturates
  • Methadone
  • Phencyclidine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methamphetamine
  • Propoxyphene
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates

12 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 12 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamines
  • Marijuana
  • Oxycodone
  • Barbiturates
  • Meperidine
  • Phencyclidine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methadone
  • Propoxyphene
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates
  • Tramadol

When You Need A Test, Choose The Best!

To schedule a hair follicle drug test, Call (800)221-4291.

For more information on drug testing in the private sector – CLICK HERE

For more information on DOT drug testing requirements – CLICK HERE

For more information on a Drug Free Work Place Program – CLICK HERE

About Kansas


Kansas is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern United States. It is named after the Kansa Native American tribe which inhabited the area. The tribe’s name is often said to mean “people of the wind” or “people of the south wind,” although this was probably not the term’s original meaning. Residents of Kansas are called “Kansans”. For thousands of years, what is now Kansas was home to numerous and diverse Native American tribes. Tribes in the eastern part of the state generally lived in villages along the river valleys. Tribes in the western part of the state were semi-nomadic and hunted large herds of bison. Kansas was first settled by European Americans in the 1830s, but the pace of settlement accelerated in the 1850s, in the midst of political wars over the slavery issue. When it was officially opened to settlement by the U.S. government in 1854, abolitionist Free-Staters from New England and pro-slavery settlers from neighboring Missouri rushed to the territory to determine whether Kansas would become a free state or a slave state. Thus, the area was a hotbed of violence and chaos in its early days as these forces collided, and was known as Bleeding Kansas. The abolitionists eventually prevailed and on January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the Union as a free state. After the Civil War, the population of Kansas grew rapidly when waves of immigrants turned the prairie into farmland. Today, Kansas is one of the most productive agricultural states, producing high yields of wheat, corn, sorghum, and soybeans. Kansas is the 15th most extensive and the 34th most populous of the 50 United States.

Kansas is bordered by Nebraska on the north; Missouri on the east; Oklahoma on the south; and Colorado on the west. The state is divided into 105 counties with 628 cities, and is located equidistant from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The geographic center of the 48 contiguous states is located in Smith County near Lebanon. Until 1989, the Meades Ranch Triangulation Station in Osborne County was the geodetic center of North America: the central reference point for all maps of North America. The geographic center of Kansas is located in Barton County. Kansas is underlain by a sequence of horizontal to gently westward dipping sedimentary rocks. A sequence of Mississippian, Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks outcrop in the eastern and southern part of the state. The western half of the state has exposures of Cretaceous through Tertiary sediments, the latter derived from the erosion of the uplifted Rocky Mountains to the west. These are underlain by older Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments which correlate well with the outcrops to the east. The northeastern corner of the state was subjected to glaciation in the Pleistocene and is covered by glacial drift and loess.

For millennia, the land that is currently Kansas was inhabited by Native Americans. The first European to set foot in present-day Kansas was Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, who explored the area in 1541. In 1803, most of modern Kansas was secured by the United States as part of the Louisiana Purchase. Southwest Kansas, however, was still a part of Spain, Mexico and the Republic of Texas until the conclusion of the Mexican-American War in 1848. From 1812 to 1821, Kansas was part of the Missouri Territory. The Santa Fe Trail traversed Kansas from 1821 to 1880, transporting manufactured goods from Missouri and silver and furs from Santa Fe, New Mexico. Wagon ruts from the trail are still visible in the prairie today. In 1827, Fort Leavenworth became the first permanent settlement of white Americans in the future state. The Kansas–Nebraska Act became law on May 30, 1854, establishing the U.S. territories of Nebraska and Kansas, and opening the area to broader settlement by whites. Kansas Territory stretched all the way to the Continental Divide and included the sites of present-day Denver, Colorado Springs, and Pueblo. Missouri and Arkansas sent settlers into Kansas all along its eastern border. These settlers attempted to sway votes in favor of slavery. The secondary settlement of Americans in Kansas Territory were abolitionists from Massachusetts and other Free-States, who attempted to stop the spread of slavery from neighboring Missouri. Directly presaging the American Civil War, these forces collided, entering into skirmishes that earned the territory the name of Bleeding Kansas.