Hair Follicle Drug Testing Missouri

Hair Follicle Drug Testing Missouri

Hair Follicle Drug Testing Missouri

5 Panel – 10 Panel – 12 Panel

Hair Follicle Drug Test

Accredited Drug Testing Inc provides hair follicle drug testing Missouri in all cities and most Missouri testing centers are located within minutes of your home or office. To schedule a hair follicle drug test in Missouri call (800)221-4291.

Hair follicle drug testing in the State of Missouri is becoming a more popular method by Missouri employers and individuals in need of a hair follicle drug testing Missouri method.

In recent years the method to conduct drug testing has more frequently included a hair follicle drug test. Many employers, courts and Substance Abuse Professional are requiring a hair follicle drug test instead of a standard urine test. Hair follicle drug tests are used by employers who have zero tolerance drug use policies, courts and individuals on probation. The primary benefit of a hair follicle drug test include a much longer detection period for drug use which typically is up to 90 days. However, when screening drug use within the last 5 days the urine test continues to be the most accurate test.

Hair Follicle Drug Test Process 

The procedure used to perform a hair follicle test is simple, the drug testing specialist will cut approximately 120 strands of hair (not really a lot) utilize a chain of custody procedure and send the hair to a certified laboratory for analysis. Drug testing centers require at least 1.5 inches of hair to perform this test and the hair generally needs to come from the head, however if the donor does not have head hair certain testing centers can use hair from chest, leg or arm pit.

If a donor has no hair on their body, than a hair test cannot be performed!  

Hair Follicle Drug Test Results

Once the hair follicles have been analyzed by a certified laboratory they will then be reviewed and then verified by a Medical Review Officer (licensed Physician) who will than release the results. Generally a negative hair follicle drug test result is available in 2-3 days. A non-negative hair follicle drug test is available in approximately 5 days.

Urine cut-off levels are expressed in nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) or as a weight of drug per unit volume of urine. Hair cut-off levels are expressed in picograms per milligram (pg/mg) or as a weight of drug per unit weight of hair

5 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 5 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamine
  • Cocaine
  • Marijuana
  • Opiates
  • Phencyclidine

5 Panel w/ Expanded Opiates Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 5 panel w/ expanded Opiates hair drug test screens for the standard 5 drugs but will also screen for Opiate class drugs such as pain killers, which may indicate abuse of prescription drugs

  • Amphetamine
  • EXPANDED OPIATES
  • Hydromorphone
  • Cocaine
  • Codeine
  • Oxycodone
  • Marijuana
  • Morphine
  • Oxymorphone
  • Phencyclidine
  • Hydrocodone
  • 6 AM- Heroine

10 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 10 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamines
  • Marijuana
  • Barbiturates
  • Methadone
  • Phencyclidine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methamphetamine
  • Propoxyphene
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates

12 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 12 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamines
  • Marijuana
  • Oxycodone
  • Barbiturates
  • Meperidine
  • Phencyclidine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methadone
  • Propoxyphene
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates
  • Tramadol

When You Need A Test, Choose The Best!

To schedule a hair follicle drug test, Call (800)221-4291.

For more information on drug testing in the private sector – CLICK HERE

For more information on DOT drug testing requirements – CLICK HERE

For more information on a Drug Free Work Place Program – CLICK HERE

About Missouri


Missouri (see pronunciations) is a state located in the Midwestern United States. It is the 21st most extensive, and the 18th most populous of the fifty states. The state comprises 114 counties and the independent city of St. Louis. As defined by the 2010 US census, the four largest urban areas in order of population are St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, and Columbia. The mean center of the United States population at the 2010 census was in the town of Plato in Texas County. The state’s capital is Jefferson City. The land that is now Missouri was acquired from France as part of the Louisiana Purchase and became known as the Missouri Territory. Part of this territory was admitted into the union as the 24th state on August 10, 1821. Missouri’s geography is highly varied. The northern part of the state lies in dissected till plains and the southern portion lies in the Ozark Mountains (a dissected plateau), with the Missouri River dividing the regions. The state lies at the intersection of the three greatest rivers of United States, with the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers near St. Louis, and the confluence of the Ohio River with the Mississippi north of the Bootheel. The starting points for the Pony Express, Santa Fe Trail, and Oregon Trail were all located in Missouri as well.

Missouri borders eight different states as does its neighbor, Tennessee. No state in the U.S. touches more than eight. Missouri is bounded by Iowa on the north; by Illinois, Kentucky, and Tennessee across the Mississippi River on the east; on the south by Arkansas; and by Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska (the last across the Missouri River) on the west. The two largest rivers are the Mississippi (which defines the eastern boundary of the state) and the Missouri River (which flows from west to east through the state) essentially connecting the two largest metros of Kansas City and St. Louis. Although it is usually today considered part of the Midwest, Missouri was historically considered by many to be a border state, chiefly because of the settlement of migrants from the South and its status as a slave state before the Civil War, balanced by the influence of the St. Louis. The counties that made up “Little Dixie” were those along the Missouri River in the center of the state, settled by Southern migrants who held the greatest concentration of slaves. In 2005, Missouri received 16,695,000 visitors to its national parks and other recreational areas totaling 202,000 acres (820 km2), giving it $7.41 million in annual revenues, 26.6% of its operating expenditures.