Hair Follicle Drug Testing New Hampshire

Hair Follicle Drug Testing New Hampshire

Hair Follicle Drug Testing New Hampshire

5 Panel – 10 Panel – 12 Panel

Hair Follicle Drug Test

Accredited Drug Testing Inc provides hair follicle drug testing New Hampshire in all cities and most New Hampshire testing centers are located within minutes of your home or office. To schedule a hair follicle drug test in New Hampshire call (800)221-4291.

Hair follicle drug testing in the State of New Hampshire is becoming a more popular method by New Hampshire employers and individuals in need of a hair follicle drug testing New Hampshire method.

In recent years the method to conduct drug testing has more frequently included a hair follicle drug test. Many employers, courts and Substance Abuse Professional are requiring a hair follicle drug test instead of a standard urine test. Hair follicle drug tests are used by employers who have zero tolerance drug use policies, courts and individuals on probation. The primary benefit of a hair follicle drug test include a much longer detection period for drug use which typically is up to 90 days. However, when screening drug use within the last 5 days the urine test continues to be the most accurate test.

Hair Follicle Drug Test Process 

The procedure used to perform a hair follicle test is simple, the drug testing specialist will cut approximately 120 strands of hair (not really a lot) utilize a chain of custody procedure and send the hair to a certified laboratory for analysis. Drug testing centers require at least 1.5 inches of hair to perform this test and the hair generally needs to come from the head, however if the donor does not have head hair certain testing centers can use hair from chest, leg or arm pit.

If a donor has no hair on their body, than a hair test cannot be performed!  

Hair Follicle Drug Test Results

Once the hair follicles have been analyzed by a certified laboratory they will then be reviewed and then verified by a Medical Review Officer (licensed Physician) who will than release the results. Generally a negative hair follicle drug test result is available in 2-3 days. A non-negative hair follicle drug test is available in approximately 5 days.

Urine cut-off levels are expressed in nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) or as a weight of drug per unit volume of urine. Hair cut-off levels are expressed in picograms per milligram (pg/mg) or as a weight of drug per unit weight of hair

5 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 5 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamine
  • Cocaine
  • Marijuana
  • Opiates
  • Phencyclidine

5 Panel w/ Expanded Opiates Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 5 panel w/ expanded Opiates hair drug test screens for the standard 5 drugs but will also screen for Opiate class drugs such as pain killers, which may indicate abuse of prescription drugs

  • Amphetamine
  • EXPANDED OPIATES
  • Hydromorphone
  • Cocaine
  • Codeine
  • Oxycodone
  • Marijuana
  • Morphine
  • Oxymorphone
  • Phencyclidine
  • Hydrocodone
  • 6 AM- Heroine

10 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 10 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamines
  • Marijuana
  • Barbiturates
  • Methadone
  • Phencyclidine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methamphetamine
  • Propoxyphene
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates

12 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 12 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamines
  • Marijuana
  • Oxycodone
  • Barbiturates
  • Meperidine
  • Phencyclidine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methadone
  • Propoxyphene
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates
  • Tramadol

When You Need A Test, Choose The Best!

To schedule a hair follicle drug test, Call (800)221-4291.

For more information on drug testing in the private sector – CLICK HERE

For more information on DOT drug testing requirements – CLICK HERE

For more information on a Drug Free Work Place Program – CLICK HERE

About New Hampshire


New Hampshire is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, Vermont to the west, Maine and the Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. New Hampshire is the 5th smallest by land area, and the 9th least populous of the 50 United States. In January 1776 it became the first of the British North American colonies to establish a government independent of Great Britain’s authority and it was the first to establish its own state constitution. Six months later, it became one of the original 13 states that founded the United States of America, and in June 1788 it was the ninth state to ratify the United States Constitution, bringing that document into effect. Concord is the state capital, while Manchester is the largest city in the state. It has no general sales tax, nor is personal income (other than interest and dividends) taxed at either the state or local level. It is known for the New Hampshire primary, the first primary in the U.S. presidential election cycle. Its license plates carry the state motto: “Live Free or Die”. The state’s nickname, “The Granite State”, refers to its extensive granite formations and quarries. Among prominent individuals from New Hampshire are founding father Nicholas Gilman, Senator Daniel Webster, Revolutionary War hero John Stark, editor Horace Greeley, founder of the Christian Science religion Mary Baker Eddy, poet Robert Frost, astronaut Alan Shepard, rock musician Ronnie James Dio, author Dan Brown, actor Adam Sandler, inventor Dean Kamen, and President of the United States Franklin Pierce. With some of the largest ski mountains on the East Coast, New Hampshire’s major recreational attractions include skiing, snowmobiling, and other winter sports, hiking and mountaineering, observing the fall foliage, summer cottages along many lakes and the seacoast, motor sports at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway, and Motorcycle Week, a popular motorcycle rally held in Weirs Beach near Laconia in June. The White Mountain National Forest links the Vermont and Maine portions of the Appalachian Trail, and boasts the Mount Washington Auto Road, where visitors may drive to the top of 6,288-foot (1,917 m) Mount Washington.

New Hampshire is part of the New England region. It is bounded by Quebec, Canada, to the north and northwest; Maine and the Atlantic Ocean to the east; Massachusetts to the south; and Vermont to the west. New Hampshire’s major regions are the Great North Woods, the White Mountains, the Lakes Region, the Seacoast, the Merrimack Valley, the Monadnock Region, and the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee area. New Hampshire has the shortest ocean coastline of any U.S. coastal state, with a length of 18 miles (29 km), sometimes measured as only 13 miles. New Hampshire was home to the rock formation called the Old Man of the Mountain, a face-like profile in Franconia Notch, until the formation disintegrated in May 2003. The White Mountains range in New Hampshire spans the north-central portion of the state, with Mount Washington the tallest in the northeastern U.S. – site of the second-highest wind speed ever recorded – and other mountains like Mount Madison and Mount Adams surrounding it. With hurricane-force winds every third day on average, over 100 recorded deaths among visitors, and conspicuous krumholtz (dwarf, matted trees much like a carpet of bonsai trees), the climate on the upper reaches of Mount Washington has inspired the weather observatory on the peak to claim that the area has the “World’s Worst Weather”. In the flatter southwest corner of New Hampshire, the landmark Mount Monadnock has given its name to a class of earth-forms – a monadnock – signifying, in geomorphology, any isolated resistant peak rising from a less resistant eroded plain.

Major rivers include the 110-mile (177 km) Merrimack River, which bisects the lower half of the state north-south and ends up in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Its tributaries include the Contoocook River, Pemigewasset River, and Winnipesaukee River. The 410-mile (660 km) Connecticut River, which starts at New Hampshire’s Connecticut Lakes and flows south to Connecticut, defines the western border with Vermont. The state border is not in the center of that river, as usually the case, but at the low-water mark on the Vermont side; meaning that the entire river along the Vermont border (save for areas where the water level has been raised by a dam) lies within New Hampshire. Only one town – Pittsburg – shares a land border with the state of Vermont. The “northwesternmost headwaters” of the Connecticut also define the Canadian border with New Hampshire. The Piscataqua River and its several tributaries form the state’s only significant ocean port where they flow into the Atlantic at Portsmouth. The Salmon Falls River and the Piscataqua define the southern portion of the border with Maine. The Piscataqua River boundary was the subject of a border dispute between New Hampshire and Maine in 2001, with New Hampshire claiming dominion over several islands (primarily Seavey’s Island) that include the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. The U.S. Supreme Court dismissed the case in 2002, leaving ownership of the island with Maine. New Hampshire still claims sovereignty of the base, however. The largest of New Hampshire’s lakes is Lake Winnipesaukee, which covers 71 square miles (184 km2) in the east-central part of New Hampshire. Umbagog Lake along the Maine border, approximately 12.3 square miles (31.9 km2), is a distant second. Squam Lake is the second largest lake entirely in New Hampshire. New Hampshire has the shortest ocean coastline of any state in the United States, approximately 18 miles (29 km) long. Hampton Beach is a popular local summer destination. About 7 miles (11 km) offshore are the Isles of Shoals, nine small islands (four of which are in New Hampshire) known as the site of a 19th-century art colony founded by poet Celia Thaxter, and the alleged location of one of the buried treasures of the pirate Blackbeard.