Hair Follicle Drug Testing Wisconsin

Hair Follicle Drug Testing Wisconsin

Hair Follicle Drug Testing Wisconsin

5 Panel – 10 Panel – 12 Panel

Hair Follicle Drug Test

Accredited Drug Testing Inc provides hair follicle drug testing Wisconsin in all cities and most Wisconsin testing centers are located within minutes of your home or office. To schedule a hair follicle drug test in Wisconsin call (800)221-4291.

Hair follicle drug testing in the State of Wisconsin is becoming a more popular method by Wisconsin employers and individuals in need of a hair follicle drug testing Wisconsin method.

In recent years the method to conduct drug testing has more frequently included a hair follicle drug test. Many employers, courts and Substance Abuse Professional are requiring a hair follicle drug test instead of a standard urine test. Hair follicle drug tests are used by employers who have zero tolerance drug use policies, courts and individuals on probation. The primary benefit of a hair follicle drug test include a much longer detection period for drug use which typically is up to 90 days. However, when screening drug use within the last 5 days the urine test continues to be the most accurate test.

Hair Follicle Drug Test Process 

The procedure used to perform a hair follicle test is simple, the drug testing specialist will cut approximately 120 strands of hair (not really a lot) utilize a chain of custody procedure and send the hair to a certified laboratory for analysis. Drug testing centers require at least 1.5 inches of hair to perform this test and the hair generally needs to come from the head, however if the donor does not have head hair certain testing centers can use hair from chest, leg or arm pit.

If a donor has no hair on their body, than a hair test cannot be performed!  

Hair Follicle Drug Test Results

Once the hair follicles have been analyzed by a certified laboratory they will then be reviewed and then verified by a Medical Review Officer (licensed Physician) who will than release the results. Generally a negative hair follicle drug test result is available in 2-3 days. A non-negative hair follicle drug test is available in approximately 5 days.

Urine cut-off levels are expressed in nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) or as a weight of drug per unit volume of urine. Hair cut-off levels are expressed in picograms per milligram (pg/mg) or as a weight of drug per unit weight of hair

5 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 5 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamine
  • Cocaine
  • Marijuana
  • Opiates
  • Phencyclidine

5 Panel w/ Expanded Opiates Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 5 panel w/ expanded Opiates hair drug test screens for the standard 5 drugs but will also screen for Opiate class drugs such as pain killers, which may indicate abuse of prescription drugs

  • Amphetamine
  • EXPANDED OPIATES
  • Hydromorphone
  • Cocaine
  • Codeine
  • Oxycodone
  • Marijuana
  • Morphine
  • Oxymorphone
  • Phencyclidine
  • Hydrocodone
  • 6 AM- Heroine

10 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 10 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamines
  • Marijuana
  • Barbiturates
  • Methadone
  • Phencyclidine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methamphetamine
  • Propoxyphene
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates

12 Panel Hair Follicle Drug Test

The 12 panel hair follicle drug test screens for the following

  • Amphetamines
  • Marijuana
  • Oxycodone
  • Barbiturates
  • Meperidine
  • Phencyclidine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Methadone
  • Propoxyphene
  • Cocaine
  • Opiates
  • Tramadol

When You Need A Test, Choose The Best!

To schedule a hair follicle drug test, Call (800)221-4291.

For more information on drug testing in the private sector – CLICK HERE

For more information on DOT drug testing requirements – CLICK HERE

For more information on a Drug Free Work Place Program – CLICK HERE

About Wisconsin


Wisconsin is a U.S. state located in the north-central United States, in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions. It is bordered by Minnesota to the west, Iowa to the southwest, Illinois to the south, Lake Michigan to the east, Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior to the north. Wisconsin is the 23rd largest state by total area and the 20th most populous. The state capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee, which is located on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The state is divided into 72 counties. Wisconsin’s geography is diverse, with the Northern Highland and Western Upland along with a part of the Central Plain occupying the western part of the state and lowlands stretching to the shore of Lake Michigan. Wisconsin is second to Michigan in the length of its Great Lakes coastline. Wisconsin is known as “America’s Dairyland” because it is one of the nation’s leading dairy producers, particularly famous for cheese. Manufacturing, especially paper products, information technology (IT), and tourism are also major contributors to the state’s economy. Wisconsin is bordered by the Montreal River; Lake Superior and Michigan to the north; by Lake Michigan to the east; by Illinois to the south; and by Iowa to the southwest and Minnesota to the northwest. A border dispute with Michigan was settled by two cases, both Wisconsin v. Michigan, in 1934 and 1935. The state’s boundaries include the Mississippi River and St. Croix River in the west, and the Menominee River in the northeast.

With its location between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River, Wisconsin is home to a wide variety of geographical features. The state is divided into five distinct regions. In the north, the Lake Superior Lowland occupies a belt of land along Lake Superior. Just to the south, the Northern Highland has massive mixed hardwood and coniferous forests including the 1,500,000 acres (6,100 km2) Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, as well as thousands of glacial lakes, and the state’s highest point, Timms Hill. In the middle of the state, the Central Plain has some unique sandstone formations like the Dells of the Wisconsin River in addition to rich farmland. The Eastern Ridges and Lowlands region in the southeast is home to many of Wisconsin’s largest cities. The ridges include the Niagara Escarpment that stretches from New York, the Black River Escarpment and the Magnesian Escarpment. The bedrock of the Niagara Escarpment is dolomite, while the two shorter ridges have limestone bedrock. In the southwest, the Western Upland is a rugged landscape with a mix of forest and farmland, including many bluffs on the Mississippi River. This region is part of the Driftless Area, which also includes portions of Iowa, Illinois, and Minnesota. This area was not covered by glaciers during the most recent ice age, the Wisconsin Glaciation. Overall, 46% of Wisconsin’s land area is covered by forest. Langlade County has a soil rarely found outside of the county called Antigo Silt Loam.

Wisconsin has been home to a wide variety of cultures over the past 12,000 years. The first people arrived around 10,000 BCE during the Wisconsin Glaciation. These early inhabitants, called Paleo-Indians, hunted now-extinct ice age animals such as by the Boaz mastodon, a prehistoric mastodon skeleton unearthed along with spear points in southwest Wisconsin. After the ice age ended around 8000 BCE, people in the subsequent Archaic period lived by hunting, fishing, and gathering food from wild plants. Agricultural societies emerged gradually over the Woodland period between 1000 BCE to 1000 CE. Toward the end of this period, Wisconsin was the heartland of the “Effigy Mound culture”, which built thousands of animal-shaped mounds across the landscape. Later, between 1000 and 1500 CE, the Mississippian and Oneota cultures built substantial settlements including the fortified village at Aztalan in southeast Wisconsin.[17] The Oneota may be the ancestors of the modern Ioway and Ho-Chunk tribes who shared the Wisconsin region with the Menominee at the time of European contact.[18] Other American Indian groups living in Wisconsin when Europeans first settled included the Ojibwa, Sauk, Fox, Kickapoo, and Pottawatomie, who migrated to Wisconsin from the east between 1500 and 1700.